Courtesy of pcs.org

An aphorisms is a pithy observation that contains a general truth. For instance, the phrase “if i ain’t broke, don’t fix it” is an aphorism because it bluntly tells the truth. Benjamin Franklin displays a series of twenty-six aphorisms in his book Poor Richard’s Almanack. Listed below are three examples of the aphorisms Franklin uses and an explanation of each.

1: God helps them that help themselves

In the Bible, God says that he will never leave or forsake you and if you pray and worship him, he will bless you. But, if one does not also put in the work and effort, god will not help them. In general he means, if you don’t want to help yourself, why should God help you. This particular aphorism matches the best with the virtue of industry. You have to work for things if you want to have success.

2: Love your neighbor: yet don’t pull down your hedge.

This means that you should love and forgive you friends and your peers if they do you wrong, but don’t let your guard down and let them take advantage of you again.This matches best with the both the virtue of silence and the virtue of sincerity. The virtue of silence matches with this aphorism because in order to avoid drama, sometimes you have to watch your back. But, the virtue of sincerity also matches because you should think innocently of you neighbors.

3: The proud hate pride- in others.

This means that people who have too much pride in themselves want others to fail or lack in confidence. This is going against the virtue of Sincerity because people who do this are willing to harm others to make themselves feel better.

 

Kinsella, Kate, et al. Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience. Penguin. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007. Print.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s